Loading weather information...

Dale Hollow Lake History
EST. 1943

Dale Hollow Back Story


According to the State of Tennessee, the lake takes its name from land owned first by Governor John Sevier, who located two of the first grants in this area of Overton and Clay Counties, a little over 57,000 acres. On this land many members of his family settled. The Governor called this place "The Dale" because of the formation of the land.

After the death of Gov. Sevier, his widow Bonnie Kate, moved to Overton County in 1815 and settled in the Dale community. Dale, or Lily Dale, no longer exists. The community was one of those flooded to create Dale Hollow Lake, yet its name endures in the choice of the lake's name.

Dale Hollow Dam and Lake was authorized by the Flood Control Act of 1938 and the River and Harbor Act of 1946. The project was completed by the United States Army Corps of Engineers in 1943, making the lake the oldest artificial lake in Kentucky. Hydroelectric power generating units were added in 1948, 1949 and 1953. The project was designed by the

Dale Hollow Storyline United States Army Corps of Engineers in 1943, making the lake the oldest artificial lake in Kentucky. Hydroelectric power generating units were added in 1948, 1949 and 1953. The project was designed by the Corps of Engineers and built under their supervision by private contractors. The hydroelectric generators of Dale Hollow Dam are used to supply power to the surrounding countryside. The dam, powerplant and reservoir are currently operated by the Nashville District of the Corps.

Dale Hollow lies in the Highland Rim section of the northern Tennessee and southern Kentucky, a forested, mountainous region characterized by scattered farming and low population density. This land use in the watershed area is reflected in the high quality of the water in Dale Hollow reservoir. Over the years, Corps personnel have found the water of Dale Hollow lake to be relatively free of sanitary and chemical impurities - making it one of the finest in water quality in

Over the years, Corps personnel have found the water of Dale Hollow lake to be relatively free of sanitary and chemical impurities - making it one of the finest in water quality in the Cumberland basin. The Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with other agencies in Tennessee and Kentucky, is making a continuous effort to insure that the water quality, recreational use and beauty of the lake are not impaired.

The high quality of the water in Dale Hollow reservoir is important to the operation of the fish hatchery just below the dam. The US Fish and Wildlife Service operates the service on 40 acres of land made available by the Corps of Engineers. This is typical of the cooperation between Federal agencies in providing recreational opportunities in the Cumberland basin. Built during the 1960's the hatchery produces 300,000 pounds of trout each year for Tennessee and the contiguous states. Visitors may recieve further information by calling the Hatchery manager at 931-243-2443.

Available Downloads


Stories from Dale Hollow

Download

The Town that Drowned

Download

Dale Hollow Dam History


Dale Hollow Storyline Dale Hollow Dam and Lake was authorized by the Flood Control Act of 1938 and the River and Harbor Act of 1946. The project was completed for flood control in 1943. Power generating units of 18,000-kilowatt capacity were added in 1948, 1949, and 1953, providing a total hydroelectric capacity of 54,000 kilowatts. The project was designed by the US Army Corps of Engineers and built by private contractors under the supervision of the Corps. The dam, powerhouse and reservoir are operated by Corps of Engineers personnel under the direction of the Nashville District Engineer.

Dale Hollow Dam is located approximately three miles east of Celina, Tennessee, on the Obey River, 7.3 miles above its confluence with the Cumberland River at river mile 380.9. Dale Hollow Lake covers portions of Clay, Pickett, Overton, and Fentress Counties in TN, and Clinton and Cumberland Counties in KY.